Progesterone and lipoic acid combination ameliorates death of photoreceptors in the retina

first_imgJul 31 2018Retinitis pigmentosa is a rare and hereditary neurodegenerative disease which causes vision loss due to the death of photoreceptors in the retina, and for which there is currently no treatment. The research group at the Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera on Therapeutic Strategies for Ocular Pathologies, headed by professor María Miranda Sanz, had already tested in a previous study the efficiency of progesterone to ameliorate the death of photoreceptor cells in the retina caused by this disease. Now, in a new project published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Pharmacology, they have observed a higher protective effect of progesterone when combined with a strong antioxidant: lipoic acid.As highlighted by doctor María Miranda, professor at the CEU UCH and main researcher of the group, “in this new study we verified that both progesterone and the lipoic acid are separately able to protect photoreceptors in the retina from cell death, but their simultaneous application provides even better results than individually. These results, obtained in animal models, administering both substances orally, could be the basis for developing future treatments to ameliorate the eyesight deterioration caused by retinitis pigmentosa. There is currently no treatment for a disease which represents half of those that degenerate the retina around the world.”Related StoriesAlternate cell growth pathway could open door to new treatments for metastatic cancersNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellRetina can restructure itself following gene therapyAntioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanismEven though the cause of retinitis pigmentosa is genetic, the evolution of the disease and the resulting eyesight loss may be related to oxidative stress factors and inflammation. These factors can be ameliorated on one hand by the progesterone hormone, which has shown its neuroprotective efficiency in several studies, including the one previously carried out by doctor Miranda and her team also on retinosis.On the other hand, lipoic acid is considered a strong antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties, able to reduce oxidative stress in the retina, as have also determined previous studies, including another one headed by professor Miranda. “This is why we decided to test the possible synergetic effects when combining progesterone and lipoic acid in this new study, to ameliorate the death of photoreceptors in the retina.”Research teamProfessor María Miranda Sanz, coordinator of the Degree in Optics and Optometry at the CEU UCH, is the main researcher of the “Therapeutic strategies in ocular pathologies” group, mainly dedicated to searching for new therapies for degenerative diseases that affect the visual system such as retinitis pigmentosa and diabetic retinopathy. In this new study on progesterone and lipoic acid, professor María Miranda has headed the team comprised of CEU UCH professors Rosa López-Pedrajas, Teresa Olivar and Dolores Silvestre, along with researchers Dolores Tania Ramírez Lamelas, clinical project manager from BCN Peptides in Barcelona; Soledad Benlloch-Navarro, and CEU UCH doctorate student Roberto Gimeno-Hernández. Source:http://ruvid.org/ri-world/progesterone-combined-with-lipoic-acid-to-slow-retinal-cell-damage/last_img read more

Novel discovery offers hope for treatment of Alzheimers and other neurological diseases

first_img Source:https://www.unisa.edu.au/Media-Centre/Releases/2018/Discovery-presents-treatment-hope-for-Alzheimers-and-other-neurodegenerative-diseases/#.W2vKzdIzaUk Aug 10 2018There is new hope for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases following a ground-breaking discovery made by an Australian-Chinese research collaboration.Researchers from the University of South Australia and the Third Military Medical University in China have discovered a signal pathway within cells, and also invented a potential drug that could stop degeneration and actually improve learning and memory in affected patients.UniSA’s Professor Xin-Fu Zhou and colleagues have been investigating tauopathies – which refers to a class of diseases caused by misfolding of the tau protein inside nerve cells that results in cell damage and eventually cell death.Related StoriesExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellThese diseases include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Motor Neuron Disease, all of which presently have no cure.Specifically, the team has looked into frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD), a term representing a group of clinical syndromes related to cognitive impairment, behavioral abnormalities and speech disorders.Professor Zhou says that previously it was unknown how the gene mutation was responsible for causing cell death or damage – referred to generally as neurodegeneration, and dementia in patients with FTLD and other motor neuron diseases.”Right now there is no treatment available at all,” Prof Zhou says.”We have been investigating how these tauopathies (diseases) have some common pathology, including a particular tau protein that plays a critical role in nerve cell function.”Tau protein is a protein that stabilizes microtubules and it is specifically abundant in neurons of the nervous system, but not in elsewhere.”Our research found that in both the animal model and human brains, the signal of neurotrophins and receptors is abnormal in brains with FTLD,” Prof Zhou says. “We discovered an increase in the neurotrophin signaling pathway that is related to life and death of nerve cells, known as proNGF/p75, and then found blocking its functions was shown to reduce cell damage.”Thus, in this paper we not only discovered a signaling pathway but also invented a potential drug for treatment of such diseases.”Given this strong evidence now available, the next stage is a clinical trial and South Australian biotech company Tiantai Medical Technology Pty Ltd has recently acquired a license to further develop and commercialize this medical technology.Professor Zhou says this industry involvement means there is an opportunity to translate the discovery into a treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies.last_img read more

Study shows new options to lower heart disease risk in people with

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 27 2018A drug used to manage diabetes may reduce heart disease and death in people with diabetes regardless of their cholesterol levels and whether they are on a statin therapy, suggests a new analysis of the LEADER trial.The analysis suggests people with Type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk have a lowered risk of death from heart attack, nonfatal heart attack and nonfatal stroke when receiving liraglutide treatment, regardless of their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and whether they are concurrently taking statins. Liraglutide is a medication that works through various mechanisms to help reduce blood sugar.Related StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesDr. Subodh Verma, cardiac surgeon-scientist and director of the CardioLink platform at the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science (KRCBS) of St. Michael’s Hospital in Canada, presented these findings at the European Society of Cardiology Annual Congress in Munich, Germany. They were published simultaneously in in Circulation. Dr. Lawrence Leiter, director of the Lipid Clinic at St. Michael’s, and Dr. David Mazer, associate scientist at the KRCBS co-led the study. St. Michael’s was one of more than 400 international sites to participate in the LEADER trial, an FDA-mandated randomized control trial involving more than 9,300 patients with Type 2 diabetes to evaluate liraglutide and its effects on heart disease.”One of the many ways in which we reduce heart disease is by treating people with statins to lower their cholesterol,” Dr. Verma said. “This work brings us closer to understanding whether there is further benefit of newer agents that treat diabetes and whether those benefits persist in people who are taking statins.”LDL-C levels are an important marker of developing heart disease. Higher levels of LDL-C are associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease. Statins are lipid-lowering medications that lower the risk of heart disease.Dr. Verma said these results are exciting as they show there are more options to lowering heart disease risk in people with diabetes than the use of statins alone.”This analysis suggests that we have another tool in our armamentarium to further reduce risk for people who have Type 2 diabetes,” he said. Source:http://www.stmichaelshospital.com/media/detail.php?source=hospital_news/2018/0827blast_img read more

Expat virologist takes to YouTube to challenge pseudoscience behind Egyptian devices

Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Earlier this year, the Engineering Authority of Egypt’s military announced a hand-held instrument that could detect a variety of viral infections without even touching a person, and another device that clears a patient’s blood of viruses. Widespread treatment of Egyptian patients with both devices was scheduled to begin today, but military officials said on Saturday that they were delaying the rollout for another 6 months.That decision comes after months of controversy. According to government officials, the treatments will not only wipe out AIDS and hepatitis at home—Egypt has the highest prevalence of hepatitis C in the world—but will also make a fortune as foreign patients flock to the country. Whereas the Western scientific community has ridiculed the devices as pseudoscience, Egyptian academics have been largely silent. The country’s military regime has been handing down harsh criminal punishments for its critics, including journalists. But one expat Egyptian scientist, Islam Hussein, has created videos, one of which has garnered more than 100,000 views on YouTube—a large number considering they are 80-minute PowerPoint presentations in Arabic explaining the devices’ scientific problems. Like most of Egypt’s top scientific talent, Hussein, 36, left his country. After a virology Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, he settled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, in the United States, where he researches avian influenza. This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. Q: What do you know about these devices?A: The first is called C-FAST. [The Egyptian Armed Forces] claim that the antenna of this device can detect an infected patient from a distance of up to 500 meters. The device doesn’t even need a battery; it is powered by the body’s static electrical energy. The antenna supposedly detects the electromagnetic waves emitted by the vibrations of the hepatitis C viral genome in a sequence-specific manner. C-FAST is one of a big series of devices that detects several viral infections: HIV, hepatitis C, influenza, MERS coronavirus, and the malaria virus. Yes, malaria [which is a parasitic cell] is now promoted to the rank of a virus.The second is called the Complete Cure Device [CCD], which looks very much like a dialysis machine. It draws blood from the patient using a pump. The infected blood passes through an expensive spiral tube—it is made of a very specialized material that its maker claims took 7 years to develop. The tube emits a mysterious radiation—it is a military secret—that kills the virus and then the blood is returned to the body.Q: What makes them implausible?A: For C-FAST, the research team has not presented any scientific evidence that electromagnetic waves emitted by viral nucleic acids are even detectable, let alone diagnostic. A discovery of this caliber deserves a Science or Nature paper. They claim that the electromagnetic signal of every virus is like a fingerprint that can be programmed onto a small chip inside the C-FAST device. By replacing a hepatitis C chip with one for influenza, a device becomes capable of detecting the flu-specific electromagnetic signal and so on.As for CCD, we don’t yet have a single scientific publication describing how this device is safe and effective. We have heard three conflicting mechanisms of action. Exposing a patient’s blood to radiation will not rid him or her of hepatitis C replicating in the liver or HIV integrated into the genomes of infected CD4+ cells. They claim to have done experiments with chimps; they even claim that thousands of people were treated during a clinical trial. Again, where is the data?Q: Are Egypt’s scientists speaking out?A: Essam Heggy, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the former adviser of the ex-president of Egypt, issued a statement that this whole thing is a big scandal. He has been attacked by Egyptian media day and night. Apart from Heggy, very few Egyptian doctors have spoken out.Q: What motivated you to make those videos?A: I couldn’t stand by watching this happen in my home country and keep quiet about it. This “cure” will affect millions of Egyptians, from the side effects of an unregulated, potentially toxic therapeutic device to false hopes that lead infected people to not take the necessary precautions.Q: Are you worried about getting noticed by the government?A: No, I am not worried. These videos were all about science and science only. There is no reason for the current regime or anybody at the Egyptian Armed Forces to get upset with what I have said.Q: What impact do you hope to have?A: Many people have made fun of the devices. However, nobody has taken the initiative to take them seriously and explain to the public why these claims are baseless. I was also hoping that my voice will reach the people behind these inventions and persuade them to change their course of action. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email read more

Star Trek engine goes where no one has gone before

Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The world’s largest laser, a machine that appeared in a Star Trek movie, has attained a powerful result: It’s squeezed diamond, the least compressible substance known, 50 million times harder than Earth’s atmosphere presses down on us. The finding should help scientists better understand how material behaves at the great pressures that prevail deep inside giant planets.   Physicist Ray Smith of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, and his colleagues achieved the feat at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), also in Livermore. Spanning 10 meters and armed with scores of lasers, the instrument is so sci-fi–looking that it appeared as the “warp core” of the starship Enterprise in the 2013 movie Star Trek Into Darkness. NIF has a practical purpose, however: to trigger nuclear fusion, the same type of reaction that powers the sun, in the hope of someday solving our energy needs. Scientists also use it for basic research, such as investigating how various materials respond when compressed—data relevant to the interiors of planets. In the new study, Smith’s team fired 176 lasers at a small gold cylinder measuring 1.1 centimeters long and 0.6 centimeters in diameter. The lasers heated the gold so that it emitted x-rays, which squeezed a tiny diamond attached over a hole in the cylinder’s outer wall. The diamond reached a pressure of 50 million atmospheres—14 times greater than the pressure at Earth’s center.  As the researchers report online today in Nature, the x-ray assault nearly quadrupled the diamond’s density. “That’s a record,” Smith says. “No one’s compressed diamond to that extent before.” The blast pulverized the diamond into dust, but before the mineral’s destruction the scientists successfully measured its density as the pressure rose. For a billionth of a second, the diamond, which is normally 3.25 times denser than water, became denser than lead and 12.03 times denser than water.”This is an impressive accomplishment,” says David Stevenson of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, a planetary scientist who was not involved in the experiment. “This is high-quality data at very high pressures.” Such great pressure is comparable to that at the center of giant planets: Jupiter’s core has a pressure between 40 million and 90 million atmospheres, while the pressure at Saturn’s center is about 40 million atmospheres.   Neither world has a diamond core, however. Diamond consists of carbon, and in our solar system oxygen is twice as common and makes up silicate rocks, a major component of the sun’s planets. Still, scientists have speculated that diamond worlds may exist elsewhere. If a solar system arises with more carbon than oxygen, then carbon should soak up the oxygen by forming carbon monoxide, leaving excess carbon to create carbon planets—which, under pressure, become diamond worlds. Thus, Smith says, the new experiment will probe the nature of such planets.   Astronomer Jonathan Fortney of the University of California, Santa Cruz, thinks carbon planets are rare, however, so he hopes the scientists investigate other materials. One element he mentions is iron, which may make up the cores of super-Earths—planets several times more massive than our own. Smith says his team is now studying this material and hopes to have results soon. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe read more

In Hawaii protests force pause in construction of worlds largest telescope

first_img Email Protesters expressed skepticism about Ige’s effort and say they are prepared to remain hunkered down on Mauna Kea’s cold and forbidding slopes until the project is stopped. “Regardless if they stop construction for one week, it doesn’t matter … [the project is] still illegal, it’s still desecration, and we still oppose it,” says Kahookahi Kanuha, an organizer and spokesman for the protesters who has spent most of the past 2 weeks at their mountainside encampment. The moratorium, he says, is simply an attempt to “save face” and stall for time in a bid to wear down the protesters. Construction of the TMT should not have started, he argued, while legal challenges to the project remain unresolved in state courts.In a statement, Ige said he was calling for the moratorium so that he could “evaluate the situation from multiple perspectives.” He pledged to work with leadership at the University of Hawaii, which administers the sublease of summit lands to the TMT, and the state’s Office of Hawaiian Affairs to seek a resolution to the conflict.TMT Spokesman Gordon Squires confirmed that the shutdown of the project—which has completed a 7-year public review process and was approved to proceed last month—was not imposed by the governor’s office, but agreed to by the international consortium that is developing the telescope.Both astronomers and Native Hawaiians see Mauna Kea as a special place. The TMT is sited within a 212-hectare reserve that was set aside by the state of Hawaii for astronomy projects in the 1960s, as a result of its altitude and dark skies. There are already 13 telescopes within the reserve, but the enormous scale of the TMT—which, including parking and roads, would cover a total area of 2 hectares and stand 18 stories above ground—would dwarf them all.Traditionally, Native Hawaiians consider Mauna Kea to be a sacred realm inhabited by several major gods and a place that, traditionally, could be visited by humans only for special ceremonies. Today, many also believe the summit is mismanaged by the University of Hawaii and the state. Although the reserve is set aside for science, critics note that the mountain is often crowded with commercial stargazing tours. The summit is also an ecologically fragile area, TMT opponents note, and is the location of hundreds of archaeological sites.TMT backers, however, say the telescope has gone through a careful review since it applied for permits in 2008. “The TMT site was selected with great care and respect,” Project Manager Gary Sanders said in a statement. “There are no archaeological shrines or burial sites within TMT’s project site.” And there has been “ongoing dialogue and meaningful discussion” among parties with various points of view during the process, he added.Such assurances mean little to the protesters. “Our ultimate goal is to stop the construction, stop the desecration of our mountain,” Kanuha says. Although he and his allies support ongoing legal challenges to the TMT, he says they have little faith in the courts and are employing more direct, grassroots opposition. They hope a long-term blockade will cause costly delays and eventually force the TMT’s international group of funders to abandon the project.At the same time, Kanuha and others hope to use the TMT protests to highlight another cause: Hawaiian sovereignty. Some activists contend the islands have been illegally occupied by the United States since the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893, and “the people of Hawaii have never stood on a more grand, more noticeable platform” to discuss that issue, Kanuha says.In the meantime, University of Hawaii Spokesman Dan Meisenzahl noted that the university is in the process of seeking a 65-year extension of its lease on the summit from the state’s Department of Land and Natural Resources. “Part of that ask is to promise that there will be no more development,” he says. “TMT will be the last telescope on the mountain.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The governor of Hawaii yesterday brokered a 1-week pause in the construction of the world’s largest telescope atop the Mauna Kea volcano in the wake of protests by Native Hawaiian activists, who say the project is desecrating sacred land.“There will be no construction activities this week,” Governor David Ige (D) said Tuesday at a news conference announcing the pause in work on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). “This will give us some time to engage in further conversations with the various stakeholders that have an interest in Mauna Kea and its sacredness and its importance in scientific research and discovery going forward.”Ige’s announcement came after police last week arrested 31 protesters who had blocked a road to the TMT construction site near the summit of the 4200-meter-high volcano. The arrests sparked outrage among Native Hawaiian activists, with groups holding rallies across the state. Ige has said the pause is needed to give the various parties time for discussion.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send you spinning off into space Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Walk, don’t run, on the martian moon Phobos. A new study finds that traveling faster than about 5 kilometers per hour on some regions of the Red Planet’s largest satellite could shoot you straight off into space.Phobos (pictured) is an odd duck among our solar system’s moons. It’s tiny (a fraction of a percent the size of our own moon) and is shaped like a potato; that weird shape draws gravity to different places, depending on where you are.All these features make Phobos a challenge to travel on, researchers report in Advances in Space Research. In some places, moving any faster than 5 kilometers per hour would be enough to free you from the moon’s meager gravitational pull, sending you off into space where you’d likely be captured by Mars’s gravity and end up orbiting the Red Planet. The fastest you could travel anywhere on Phobos would be about 36 kilometers per hour, or a little faster than a golf cart, the team finds. University of Arizona/JPL-Caltech/NASA Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The findings could pose problems for planned missions to Phobos. Several Russian missions have already failed to reach the moon, though one attained martian orbit in the late 1980s before contact was lost. A Japanese landing mission slated for the early 2020s will involve observing the moon and extracting samples.The authors say traveling on the moon will have to happen in slow motion in some places in order to keep contact with the surface. Meanwhile, anything driving on the surface or hovering nearby may need autonomous navigation and control systems to adapt to the wonky spin rate and Phobos’s gravity, to avoid being lost in space. By Joshua Rapp LearnNov. 15, 2018 , 3:25 PM Emaillast_img read more

The northern and southern lights are different Heres why

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The northern lights (above) and their lesser-known sibling the southern lights, aurora borealis and aurora australis, respectively, undulate across the skies in hazy green and sometimes red ribbons near Earth’s polar regions. The two phenomena aren’t identical, however, and now researchers think they know why.Aurorae appear as solar wind, a gust of charged particles emitted by the sun, blows across Earth’s magnetic field. Because the charged particles flow along symmetrical lines in Earth’s magnetic field linking the north and south poles, it made sense to assume the atmospheric displays in each hemisphere would mirror each other. Advances in Earth imaging technology overturned this way of thinking in 2009, when scientists observed simultaneous aurorae drifting across the poles in patterns that didn’t match up.The study examined images of 10 asymmetric aurorae taken simultaneously from both poles and related changes in the aurorae to changes in Earth’s magnetotail, a windsocklike extension of Earth’s magnetic field. The researchers found that when solar wind approaches Earth from an east-west direction, it creates uneven pressure on Earth’s magnetotail and tilts it toward the side of the planet shrouded in darkness. That tilt causes the idiosyncrasies of shape and location of the northern and southern lights, the team reports this week in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics. The findings could improve the prediction of solar storms—which can disrupt electricity grids, satellites, and astronauts in space, the team says. For now, though, observers can just appreciate these stunning—but distinct—light shows. The northern and southern lights are different. Here’s why Pixabay Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Alex FoxJan. 25, 2019 , 5:10 PMlast_img read more

Surging cases have dashed all hope that polio might be eradicated in

first_imgPakistan and Afghanistan are considered one epidemiologic block, with the virus flowing freely across the border. The main problem in both countries is that the massive vaccination campaigns held every few months are still not reaching every child.In Pakistan, national elections in July 2018 distracted government officials, and the quality of the vaccination campaigns slipped. Meanwhile, the poor, neglected communities where the polio virus lurks are increasingly refusing the vaccine. Lacking running water, sanitation, and basic health services, people face far more immediate health threats than the now-slim chance of contracting polio, and they don’t understand why vaccinators arrive with only polio drops. Since the government began to jail parents who do not comply several years ago, the opposition has gone underground, with parents hiding their children or using fake finger markings to pretend they have been vaccinated. 1 51 Ethiopia Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country 31 Indonesia China Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Still no end in sight Polio cases caused by the wild virus, which is still circulating in Afghanistan and Pakistan, are up compared with the same period last year. Meanwhile, vaccine-derived outbreaks pose a continuing problem, primarily in Africa. 53 AP PHOTO/ARSHAD BUTT MozambiqueDRCNigerNigeria Angola261143 2 The global initiative to eradicate polio is badly stuck, battling the virus on two fronts. New figures show the wild polio virus remains entrenched in Afghanistan and in Pakistan, its other holdout, where cases are surging. In Africa, meanwhile, the vaccine itself is spawning virulent strains. The leaders of the world’s biggest public health program are now admitting that success is not just around the corner—and intensively debating how to break the impasse.”The biggest problem for me for a long time was recognizing that we truly have a problem, and business as usual will not get us to the finish line,” says Roland Sutter, who leads polio research at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland, where the polio eradication effort is based. “The rose-tinted glasses are off,” adds longtime program spokesperson Oliver Rosenbauer of WHO. “Now, really tough questions are openly being asked—questions that even 12 months ago no one asked.”The program, which has spent $16 billion over 30 years, had planned to eradicate polio from Pakistan and Afghanistan this year (only the latest of many deadlines). Instead, almost four times as many cases have occurred there so far this year than in the same period in 2018. At 51, the total number of cases may still seem low, but only about one in every 200 people infected with the virus develops paralysis, meaning thousands have been infected. The virus is circulating widely: A strain from Karachi, Pakistan, has popped up in Iran. Adding to the worries, the spike occurred in the low season, when viral transmission subsides—a harbinger of worse to come in the second half of the year. 26 Papua New Guinea A relative mourns a female polio vaccinator killed by gunmen in Pakistan in January 2018.center_img Pakistan 1 Vaccine-derivedPolio cases (2018 and 2019 combined): 1 A. Cuadra/Science Somalia Afghanistan 1 Cases:January–10 July 2018 By Leslie RobertsJul. 10, 2019 , 5:20 PM 15 Cases:January–10 July 2019 Wild Email 251328 Surging cases have dashed all hope that polio might be eradicated in 2019 Exacerbating the situation is a vitriolic disinformation campaign on social media, says virologist Mark Pallansch of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, one of the partner agencies in the initiative. Deadly attacks on polio vaccinators and their police escorts are on the rise. Still, if Pakistan’s government makes eradication a national priority and puts money behind it, Sutter says, “There is a fighting chance” of success.In Afghanistan, ongoing conflict has kept vaccinators out of broad swaths of the country. The Taliban has banned polio vaccination in some places; in others, local leaders have prohibited door-to-door polio drives. One of their concerns is that outsiders might gather information that could enable the United States to target drone strikes, some in the program say. “Polio eradication is collateral damage to the peace talks,” says WHO’s Michel Zaffran, who heads the global initiative. Afghanistan has not yet seen a spike in cases this year, but one is inevitable if vaccinators can’t reach large numbers of children, says WHO’s Chris Maher, who has been leading eradication operations in the region. Still, the program has dealt with conflict before, says Jay Wenger of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, another partner in the eradication effort: “In Syria and Nigeria we found ways to get good enough vaccine coverage to stop the virus.”In Africa, the wild polio virus appears to be gone, but the vaccine-derived viruses circulating there are just as dangerous. These strains arise when the weakened live virus used in the oral polio vaccine (OPV) mutates and regains its virulence. In rare instances, where a population’s immunity is low, they can spread just like the wild virus. Last year, vaccine-derived viruses paralyzed 105 children worldwide; the wild virus just 33.To prevent outbreaks of vaccine-derived virus, WHO has declared that once the wild virus is gone, countries must stop all use of OPV. As a first step, in April 2016 all countries switched from the trivalent version of OPV—which covers all three types of polio virus—to a bivalent one, which lacks the type 2 component. (Wild type 2 virus is the only one that has been eradicated.)The program’s scientific advisers knew some vaccine-derived type 2 virus would linger in the first few years after the switch, sparking outbreaks. But modeling suggested the program could quickly squelch them—without starting new ones—with the judicious use of a new live vaccine, monovalent OPV2 (mOPV2), which is effective against only type 2. It’s akin to fighting fire with fire; the gamble was that mOPV2 would not spawn new outbreaks of its own. (An alternative exists, the killed or inactivated polio vaccine, which can’t revert but simply isn’t powerful enough to quash an outbreak.)The switch worked, except in Africa, where type 2 vaccine-derived outbreaks have been more frequent and much harder to stop than the models projected; they are now smoldering in seven countries. By using mOPV2, “We have now created more new emergences of the virus than we have stopped,” Pallansch says. In Nigeria, where 43 cases have been detected since 2018, type 2 virus has spread from the north to the densely populated port city of Lagos; it has also entered neighboring Niger. The Democratic Republic of the Congo has seen 26 cases. And the situation is deteriorating, a key WHO committee concluded on 29 May.Meanwhile, the program has already used nearly 260 million doses of mOPV2. “We are down to less than 10 million doses for the whole planet, and that is not enough,” says Pallansch, who chairs a committee advising WHO’s director-general on the vaccine’s use. “No one thought it was possible that we would use that amount.” And as a result of the 2016 vaccine switch, an increasing number of children lack immunity to the type 2 virus, setting the stage for an explosive outbreak. That puts the program in a bind. “We have no choice but to keep using” the monovalent vaccine, Zaffran says. “It is all we’ve got. We have to live with the risk until we have a technical solution.”Two are on the horizon. A novel OPV2, genetically engineered to reduce its chances of reversion dramatically, has passed a phase I clinical trial, supported by the Gates Foundation. “It looks as good as it can now,” Wenger says. The earliest it could possibly be available for use, however, is 2020. Further out is a new inactivated vaccine powerful enough to end outbreaks. “The race is on,” Sutter says, “and it is very hard for me to predict which will win.”Nor will he predict when polio will be gone for good. Optimistic projections, he says, are “just setting the program up for failure.”last_img read more

One man hospitalized following Fond Cole shooting

first_imgShareTweetSharePinPolice stop a vehicle under Canefield cliff in their search for the assailantOne man has been admitted at the Princess Maragret Hospital following a shooting incident which occurred on Wednesday 17th April, 2019 at Fond Cole.According to a report from Police PRO, Inspector Simon Edwards, Akhenaten Mohamed, male adult of Kings Hill, received multiple gun shot wounds from a pistol fired by a male individual during the incident which occurred at the business place, Tyres Unlimited.Mohamed was transported to the A&E Department of the PMH and subsequently admitted.Edwards said that the police are investigating the incident.last_img

Route 66 Festival Gunslinger Car Show is this weekend

first_imgJune 5, 2018 Route 66 Festival, Gunslinger Car Show is this weekend By Linda Kor Excitement is building as Holbrook prepares for the annual Route 66 Festival and Gunslinger Car Show this Friday and Saturday, June 8 and 9, in the downtown area. This year the eventSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

Amarnath Yatra curbs JK Governor Satya Pal Malik says people should bear

first_imgTo another question, Malik said that there was no impact on tourism due to restrictions on highway.“There is no impact on tourists. Gulmarg is full and we have to stop people from going to Gulmarg saying there is no space there. It is being done for security and one should bear it (restrictions),” he said. “If you go to western UP, when there is Kanwar Yatra, for one month, no vehicle plies on the highway and no one complains. Here, even if there is restriction on two hours, hue and cry is raised. We should bear it [restrictions],” Malik said.READ | Curbs during Amarnath Yatra leave Valley fumingOn Sunday evening, the Governor visited a transit camp at Pantha chowk in Srinagar, to review facilities for pilgrims.The Northern Railways last week announced the suspension of train services for five hours ever day on its Qazigund-Banihal railway section till the conclusion of the yatra. The decision followed a J&K government order, which said there will be restrictions on civilian traffic on the 97-km Qazigund-Nashri stretch on the Srinagar-Jammu national highway. J&K: Former Lakshadweep administrator set to join as advisor to Governor Malik Related News Advertising amarnath yatra, amarnath yatra accident, Satya Pal Malik, amarnath yatra safety, amarnath yatra security, jammu and kashmir amarnath yatra, india news, indian express Jammu and Kashmir Governor Satya Pal Malik.WITH RESTRICTIONS imposed on civilian traffic on a stretch of the Srinagar-Jammu national highway and suspension of train services on the Qazigund-Banihal section daily for five hours due to the Amarnath Yatra triggering anger across the Valley, J&K Governor Satya Pal Malik said Sunday that people should bear the restrictions. Farooq Khan’s appointment as J&K Governor’s advisor gets nod Advertising J&K Governor skips Martyrs’ Day function in Srinagar 2 Comment(s) Written by Adil Akhzer | Srinagar | Updated: July 8, 2019 7:12:11 amlast_img read more

Sister of Saudi Crown Prince MBS faces verdict over beating workman in

first_img India, Saudi agree on need for increasing pressure on countries backing terror: PM Modi Related News Princess Hassa bint Salman is due to go on trial in absentia on charges of complicity to violence. (NYT)The sister of Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammad Bin Salaman (MBS), faces a verdict Tuesday in a French trial pertaining to allegedly beating a workman who was refurbishing her ultra-luxury apartment in Paris. Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince gifted gold-plated submachine gun by Pakistan Princess Hassa bint Salman is due to go on trial in absentia on charges of complicity to violence with a weapon and complicity to kidnap an Egyptian-born artisan who was carrying out repairs at her father’s residence on the exclusive Avenue Foch in September 2016, the Middle East Monitor reported.During the trial, the princess’ counsel is said to have told that court that Hassa is a “caring, humble” person who is the victim of false allegations that she ordered a bodyguard to beat up the workman.The princess, who has denied the allegation, allegedly suspected the man of planning to sell the photo of her apartment. However, the workman has said that he was allegedly tied up and ordered to kiss the feet of the princess, who is thought to be in her 40s. He claimed that he was then beaten up and had his tools confiscated during an ordeal that lasted several hours. No hyphenation Advertising Advertising 8 Comment(s) “Kill him, the dog, he doesn’t deserve to live,” the workman claimed the princess to have said in an interview to Le Point news magazine in France. The princess, who is subject to an arrest warrant issued in France in March 2018, is not expected to be present on Tuesday. Meanwhile, the bodyguard has been charged with armed violence, theft, issuing death threats and holding someone against their will.Both France and Saudi Arabia have had close ties over the years, however, the two nations are headed towards a stormy period owing to the Iran nuclear deal. While the French government under Emmanuel Macron is determined to salvage the deal, Saudi along with the US has been vehemently opposing it. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 9, 2019 3:59:37 pmlast_img read more

Amazons Soaring Healthcare Ambition The Promise and the Problem

first_imgAmazon Benefits Moto Z2 Force Both political parties in the U.S. are so focused on the issue of control that neither seems focused at all on the real healthcare problem, which is that the cost/benefit analysis suggests the country is in horrid shape.If you look at the World Health Organization rankings, the U.S. is No. 1 with a bullet on cost (the most expensive of any country in the survey) but ranks a lousy No. 72 on performance.You know which country ranks first on performance on level of health? Oman, which is No. 62 on cost. France, a country often ridiculed, ranks No. 4 on performance and No. 4 on cost. Its state-sponsored system is aligned at least. However, Italy outperforms France, ranking No. 3 on performance but No. 11 on cost. Saudi Arabia is No. 10 on performance and No. 63 on cost.Using President Trump’s “winning” rhetoric, when it comes to healthcare, the U.S. not only is not winning, but also is arguably behind the world on cost benefit. Even North Korea is better aligned than the U.S. — it is No. 172 on cost and No. 153 on performance (North Koreans do not get much, but they pay even less).With all of its technology and unique advancements, the United States sucks at healthcare. The real problem with Obamacare is that it does not fix the “suck” part or the cost part — it just shifts where the bill goes.So, a whole bunch of U.S. citizens, myself included, now are paying more and getting less coverage. That is neither any way to get re-elected nor any way to run a country. Typically screwing your constituents does not work well for elections, and that played a much bigger role in the last election than most realize (or want to admit). Consumers are not the only ones with problems. Amazon is moving into one of the most heavily regulated areas in the United States and one of the areas with some of the strongest lobbies (pharmaceuticals).In addition, thanks to also owning The Washington Post, Bezos is not exactly close to the current administration. The result is that getting through regulatory approval and not suddenly finding a whole bunch of new and old laws positioned against this effort may be problematic.Once the government goes after one part of Amazon, the effort could spread more broadly to the overall business. So just bringing this service to market, given how many resources will be focused on stopping it, could be impossible. I have been a huge fan of the modular computer concept — the idea that you could have some kind of core technology that you could accessorize, turning it into something else.The first time I saw this concept was at an IBM ThinkPad Advisory Council Meeting in the late 1990s, and it is interesting that the Motorola Moto Z now is owned by the same company that now owns ThinkPad — Lenovo.I think the Moto Z concept is better idea than the iPhone X concept — not only for users but also for Apple. One big reason is that it’s a ton cheaper at around US$750. (I found refurbished versions for as little as $322 on Amazon.)This is because the Moto Z has a much stronger accessories opportunity, allowing users to customize their phones better and giving the manufacturer a stronger revenue opportunity after the phone is sold. The Problems With Amazon The Real Healthcare Problem Amazon’s Problems Rob Enderle has been an ECT News Network columnist since 2003. His areas of interest include AI, autonomous driving, drones, personal technology, emerging technology, regulation, litigation, M&E, and technology in politics. He has undergrad degrees in merchandising and manpower management, and an MBA in human resources, marketing and computer science. He is also a certified management accountant. Enderle currently is president and principal analyst of the Enderle Group, a consultancy that serves the technology industry. He formerly served as a senior research fellow at Giga Information Group and Forrester. Email Rob. There are many billionaires who live on the bleeding edge. Massively used, not that concerned with profits, but aggressively pushing expansion, they are one blunder away from disaster. Elon Musk, Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos all have been playing this high-stakes game of musical chairs — each pushing the envelope in terms of investment, expansion and risk.Bezos has stepped away from this risk a bit, as Amazon’s current stunning financials showcase. Offsetting this somewhat is pressure from the LGBT community that resulted from Amazonincluding among possible locations for its new headquarters many that were viewed as anti-LGBT. (Amazon has been supportive of LGBT issues in the past.)Moving into healthcare is just Amazon’s latest aggressive move, but it could be a move too far. It already has been having customer care issues, it is at odds with the current administration, and it will face a ton of opposition because of the needed disruption it would cause.Potentially, Amazon could fix healthcare — but it also could kill a bunch of people accidentally in the process. It is that latter outcome that has me very concerned. Healthcare is a mess in the United States. Consumers pay more and get less than in most other developed countries. Strong comprehensive healthcare is unaffordable for most without substantial help, which is why putting the burden on the government really does not work.If people cannot afford something, individually aggregating it under what amounts to a tax is not really any better — and given the extra overhead, arguably is worse.What’s needed is a way to bring costs down sharply so that whether it’s funded by the state or paid for by individuals, healthcare becomes affordable.One way to do that is to have a new player enter the market at massive scale and use its buying and political power to force the industry to reduce excessive pharmaceutical gouging, waste and excessive testing, and erect a stronger barrier to excessive litigation.Amazon, which last weekannounced its entry into the healthcare market with JP Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway, could be that company. However, as I recently discovered, Amazon already has abused its power. What will happen if it gets massively more powerful?I’ll share my thoughts on that this week and close with my product of the week, one of the most innovative smartphones in the market. Wrapping Up: Living on the Bleeding Edge I think Jeff Bezos gets this — it’s not rocket science. He likely understands that if the government really is not going to step up (it still is arguing over who pays, not the amount on the bill) then a heavy-hitting corporation must.Amazon has the reach and capability to reduce healthcare costs massively through better records management; implementation of aggressive artificial intelligence-based diagnoses or diagnosis validation; ability to negotiate better drug prices; scalable AI-based patent monitoring; and policies that could address abuses, such as the overuse of painkillers, more effectively.Individual benefits would include better and more comprehensive access to medical records; programmatic analysis of those records, triggering proactive medical procedures; more aggressive health monitoring; and far broader access to emerging medical technology and drugs.Amazon has the capability both to lower healthcare costs and raise performance, so that Americans no longer would be paying the most for healthcare while being outranked in performance by 72 countries whose citizens pay less, often far less. The Moto Z Force should outperform the new iPhone X. It has a stronger processor and none of that questionable battery- or modem-crippling software that Apple uses. It also has a screen that should be more resistant to breaking, and the broader choice of accessories the Moto line is famous for. Further, it too has a brilliant AMOLED display.Accessories that generally attach to the back of the phone include a 360-degree camera, Polaroid-like printer, Alexa-powered smart speaker, gamepad, sound booster, JBL Speaker, several power packs, wireless charging, Hasselblad lens zoom camera back, and a projector (so you can watch Netflix on your wall).Given this is the best modular computer I have ever tested, the Moto Z2 Force is my product of the week. Amazon already has gained an inordinate amount of power, and there have been signs of organizational abuse. I personally experienced it when I questioned a series of charges on a little-used credit card, and Amazon suddenly dropped me, with no warning, back into the pre-Echo dark ages. I’m still rebuilding the damage it did, even though it reinstated me last year.David Caulton covers the same topic, but Amazon is hardly the only big company to abuse its power. Our own Mick Brady got kicked in the butt by AT&T, the brand that keeps on giving.With Amazon increasingly handling everything its customers consume, a dispute with the company could result not only in the loss of Echo functionality, but also in access to critical healthcare.You dispute a bill and have a heart attack, you likely will be dead — and that level of control would be unprecedented except for the harshest of governments, let alone a retailer.Without far stronger customer controls, I have my doubts whether Amazon’s foray into healthcare will end well rather than becoming just another, deadlier, problem for many American consumers. last_img read more

Study uncovers systemic and cultural abuse violence against children in Tonga

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 2 2018A Loughborough-led study aimed at investigating the experiences of children in Tonga has uncovered systemic and cultural abuse and mistreatment of children in families and schools.The 78-page report authored by Professor Jo Aldridge highlights some of the routine violence, verbal abuse and commonplace ‘punishments’ experienced by six-to-17-year-olds across the Polynesian islands.On Monday (October 29), Tonga’s Prime Minister ʻAkilisi Pōhiva unveiled the findings, which described children being hit with planks of wood and sticks, whipped, denied food and forced to carry out tasks, as a form of discipline, by teachers and close family members.It revealed that children with disabilities were also likely to experience everyday abuse which is framed as punishment or discipline, both at home and at school.Professor Aldridge’s report highlighted the abuse as a traditional, or handed down, part of Tongan culture, which many youngsters accepted as part of their lives – even though in many cases it caused them misery.Her findings included the testimonies of numerous school-aged children, as well as their parents, grandparents and teachers, and the experiences they all shared when it came to receiving and administering discipline.She said: “This research is very important because too many children in Tonga, including children with disabilities, suffer violence and abuse both in the home and at school.”The messages from this research should be used to help transform children’s lives.”Hopefully, new policies and practices can be introduced that protect children from harm and help them to live safe and happy lives.”Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenNew curriculum to improve soft skills in schools boosts children’s health and behaviorDespite the negative experiences, some youngsters reported family life as good and enjoyable and spoke about parents with love and affection.Similarly, mothers and fathers were aware that harsh discipline practices were wrong, but poverty and hardship contributed to anxiety and stress which often also manifested itself as domestic violence.The report offered a number of recommendations to the Tongan government and organizations which work with children about how it can bring an end to violence against children.They include:• Developing and implementing a risk and protective factor framework in order to assess the short- and long-term impact of children’s exposure to violence in families and schools.• New national policies and laws to address child abuse, based on the principles set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).• Better health and social care services that include the provision of parenting support.• Improvements in education services – for example, greater awareness in schools and among school staff that physically abusing pupils is against the law.• Consulting children and young people to ensure that their views are included in any decision-making and policy-making• A national survey of schools to examine awareness and understanding among school staff of abuse issues and to collate statistical evidence on the prevalence of abuse in schools – the views of pupils should also be included in the survey.Source: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/last_img read more

UTSA research could help address genetically based challenges with male fertility

first_img Source:https://www.utsa.edu/today/2018/11/story/SpermDatabase.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 7 2018Millions of couples who have trouble conceiving may get relief from new research led by scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio. The researchers have developed a high-resolution genetic map showing how men produce sperm cells. Their effort could help address genetically based challenges with male fertility, a major cause of conception problems.The researchers’ findings reveal detailed information about which genes are turned on or off in stem cells that ultimately grow into sperm cells. This data could give doctors crucial insight into the development of sperm in a patient, a perspective that was lacking up until now.UTSA researcher Brian Hermann says the new knowledge could be a game changer for uncovering what can go wrong in men who suffer from infertility.”We took a new, cutting-edge approach down to the level of individual cells to understand all the changes in which genes are used to make sperm in the testicles. That previously had not been possible and impedes progress toward a cure for male infertility,” said Hermann, a biology professor and director of the UTSA Genomics Core.The findings appear in the November 6 edition of the scientific journal, Cell Reports. Professors Hermann and John R. McCarrey led the group, which included researchers at UTSA and across the country.Together, the team built a comprehensive digital library of the cell types required for sperm production in mice and men. They examined more than 62,000 cells and identified 11 different gene expression profiles; their work even uncovered rare and new cells for which little data was previously reported. The research, which began in early 2014, was supported by the Kleberg Foundation, the Hurd Foundation and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).According to the NIH, reproduction issues in males contribute to at least half of infertility cases among couples. Many cases of male infertility are treated with medication. Some even require surgical procedures. Yet, in almost half of these same cases, the reasons for male infertility are unknown.UTSA’s digital roadmap was constructed using the sequencing of genes expressed in germ cells. The researchers used high-tech machines which allow scientists to examine tens of thousands of individual cells and produce the library of genes expressed in each cell in one to two days. The method also employed cutting-edge bioinformatics, data analytics that decode gene expression data generated from the cells.Related StoriesLow vitamin D associated with potentially harmful vaginal bacteria in pregnant black womenFACS-based CRISPR screening shows how Chlamydia bacterium invades host cellsIncreasing iron intake does not improve the chances of conceptionUTSA’s individualized approach to profiling gene expression at the single-cell level is what makes this work different. Previous methods have relied on analyzing groups of cells, but when they are bundled together in experiments, the differences among the individual cells are averaged and therefore obscured. Hence, UTSA’s new approach provides important data that can help uncover the biology underlying how sperm are produced and what may go wrong in men who suffer from infertility.”This is how we find the needles in the haystack,” said Hermann. “We weren’t previously able to separate different cells with different functions, so in order to understand exactly how they are different, we looked at individual single cells, instead of the typical way of grabbing them all in bulk as a group.”UTSA’s new digital gene expression library offers many scientific applications. It could help improve clinical diagnoses in men with infertility because their gene expression “signatures” will be different than those in the normal men now described in this new database. The UTSA resource can also provide a foundation to help innovate the next generation of male contraception and to even potentially develop sperm outside the body.The researchers are hopeful that the methodology can also be applied to other biological processes in the body in order to uncover new information on which to base novel approaches to diagnose, treat or prevent a wide variety of diseases.”It’s been a dream for decades to take the most primitive cells in the testis and convert them into sperm in a petri dish, yet this has never worked,” said Hermann. “If anyone is going to generate sperm cells in a dish, they’d want to know how similar those cells are to those that occur naturally in the body. The data we have generated now provides a reference library for comparison.”last_img read more

Cloned antibodies show potential to treat diagnose lifethreatening fungal infections

first_img Source:http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_696538_en.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 11 2018Despite public health efforts, many people who get fungal infections in their blood streams die, even if they can be identified and treated with antifungal drugs. These therapies are often ineffective on their own and increasingly the infections are becoming resistant to treatment with some of the front line antifungal drugs.The new technique, within the Medical Research Council Centre for Medical Mycology at the University of Aberdeen and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is the first to successfully use antibodies that are cloned from patients who have recovered from an infection caused by the fungus Candida. In addition to causing thrush in more than one hundred million every year, this fungus is also the fourth leading cause of serious life-threating bloodstream infections in developed countries. In laboratory experiments, the research team used these cloned antibodies to successfully protect animals from Candida bloodstream infections and demonstrate their potential in both treating and diagnosing Candida infections.Related StoriesBreakthrough antibody treatment suppresses HIV without antiviralsSynthetic antibody rapidly prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primatesBreastmilk antibody necessary to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infantsDr Fiona Rudkin, who led the research and is currently heading up the creation of a spinout company to conduct the next phase of therapeutic development, said “There is an urgent need to develop better ways for diagnosing and treating life-threatening fungal infections. Human antibodies have revolutionized the way many cancers are treated and diagnosed. This research marks a huge step towards using similar antibody-based approaches to tackle fungal infections. These antibodies will now be developed as novel antifungal drugs through the creation of mycoBiologics – a new spin out company focused on improving the outcome of patients suffering from life-threatening fungal infections.”Professor Neil Gow of the University of Exeter, who supervised the research while at Aberdeen, said: “Globally, fungal infections are under-recognized as a major killer. They’re hard to detect and for every day we fail to diagnose a serious fungal infection, the chances of survival diminish. This research brings us a step closer to a day when we can use the antibodies that are generated by the human body to diagnose and treat fungal infections.”last_img read more

New review focuses on the structureactivity relationships of flavonoids

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 27 2018ABCB1 in the ABC transporter family also termed as P-glycoprotein, grants the simultaneous resistance of metastatic cancer cells towards various anti-cancer drugs with different targets and diverse chemical structures. For the past four decades, researchers have tried to search for safe and specific inhibitors of this pump. Naturally occurring flavonoids as benzopyrone derivatives are an example of non-toxic inhibitors of P-gp. In reversing multidrug resistance both in vitro and in vivo, the recent advent of synthetic flavonoid dimer FD18, as a potent P-gp modulator plays is also known. FD18 specifically targets the pseudodimeric structure of the drug transporter. These molecules represent a new generation of inhibitors with high transporter binding affinity and low toxicity.This review focuses upon the current updates on the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids, the molecular mechanisms of their action and their ability to overcome P-gp-mediated MDR in preclinical studies. It presents crucial implications on the discovery of new drug candidates that modulated the efflux of ABC transporters and also provides some clues for the future development of flavonoid based pharmaceuticals that act as P-gp inhibitors.Source: https://benthamscience.com/last_img read more

Study finds promising new treatment for infants with Noonan Syndrome

first_img Source:https://nouvelles.umontreal.ca/en/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 30 2019Noonan Syndrome (NS) is a rare genetic syndrome typically evident at birth and often linked to early-onset severe heart disease. NS is part of a group of diseases termed RASopathies that are caused by activating mutations of proteins belonging to the Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase families.In a new study, researchers at Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center show that a MEK inhibitor called trametinib can reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and valvular obstruction in patients with RIT1-associated NS. The groundbreaking research is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.”Up to this finding, our therapeutic options were limited to surgery, including heart transplant, and symptomatic relief with medication,” said the study’s author, Dr. Gregor Andelfinger, a pediatric cardiologist at CHU Sainte-Justine, a researcher at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center in the fetomaternal and neonatal pathologies axis, and an associate research professor in the pediatrics department of Université de Montréal.”Trametinib treatment is the first approach specifically targeted to the molecular cause of RASopathies,” said Dr. Andelfinger. “While our numbers are still very limited, we report the first patients in whom we were not only able to stabilize, but to reverse the disease of the heart. These results pave the way for larger trials, which are now needed.”Dramatic improvementInfants less than six months old with NS, HCM and congestive heart failure normally have a poor prognosis, with a one-year survival rate of 34 per cent. In the new study, the Sainte Justine clinical teams used trametinib, an inhibitor targeted specifically against the activating nature of the mutations, to try to treat NS in two patients.They observed dramatic improvement of clinical and cardiac status in the patients only three months after treatment. Hypertrophy regressed in both patients, with sustained improvement over a total of 17 months of treatment, and normalization of laboratory values. One of the patients, who required ventilation, could be extubated after six weeks of treatment. Both patients showed better overall growth after treatment was started.Related StoriesGenetic contribution to distractibility helps explain procrastinationScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgery”The findings described in this report suggest that a life-threatening form of heart disease affecting young infants might be treatable, which, if true, would be unprecedented and so meaningful for the families whose lives this devastating problem touches,” commented Dr. Bruce Gelb, director of the Mindich Child Health and Development Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.”Now we need to perform a proper clinical trial to prove that this drug is definitely working for this particular problem,” he said.A promising firstAlthough the study was limited to two patients, given the promising results these outcomes suggest that MEK inhibition merits further study as a mechanistic treatment option for patients with RASopathies, the researchers believe. The study raises important questions for the treatment of such cases, in particular with respect to long-term efficacy and impact on other RASopathy manifestations.Because of the role MEK plays in signaling heart growth, Gregor Andelfinger believes studies with a larger number of participants are now required to evaluate long-term side effects, optimal dosing and optimal treatment windows as well as investigate this treatment for other types of heart disease. It is conceivable that MEK inhibition may prove most effective during a fixed time window before the onset of irreversible cardiac remodeling in RASopathies, including those caused by genes other than RIT1.last_img read more

More effective flu vaccine begins clinical trials across the US

first_imgRelated Stories$3.1 million NIH funding awarded to develop universal flu vaccineNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsGeorgia State researcher wins $3.26 million federal grant to develop universal flu vaccineAlthough computers have been used in the past to help in drug design, this vaccine technology was independently designed by an AI program called SAM (Search Algorithm for Ligands), created by the Flinders-based team.Associate Professor Dr Dimitar Sajkov, says a number of influenza patients seen this year had received the 2019 vaccine, highlighting the need to develop a better flu shot”It is tremendous to see such a promising vaccine that we developed with the very first human trials being done at Flinders, progressing onto the world stage,””In 2009 the team at Flinders were the first in the world to develop a new swine flu vaccine to combat the 2009 pandemic. The Flinders trials confirmed both the effectiveness and speed with which this new vaccine could be delivered, resulting in many awards including the AMP National Innovation Award at the Telstra Business Awards.The US clinical trial will take about 12 months to complete and aims to recruit 240 healthy volunteers.The trial is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the US National Institutes of Health.Dr Petrovsky expressed gratitude to the US government for providing long term funding for research that led to this breakthrough.”It takes decades to develop a new human vaccine and this is extremely hard to achieve under Australian funding models which tend to be short term.” Source:Flinders University Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 1 2019A more effective seasonal flu vaccine is about to be tested in clinical trials across the US.The flu shot was working well early in the season with effectiveness around 47% in February. But this decreased substantially during a second wave of a tougher flu strain, with effectiveness at just 9%, as reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Dr Nikolai Petrovsky, Flinders University Professor and Research Director of Vaxine Pty Ltd , says current flu vaccines do provide some protection, but his team have demonstrated a lot can be done to improve their effectiveness.”Despite currently available vaccines, flu remains a very major global health problem,””During the 2017-18 Northern hemisphere flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that the US had 49 million cases of flu, 960,000 hospitalizations due to influenza complications and 79,000 deaths.”Dr Petrovsky developed the technology behind this vaccine using adjuvants- substances which act as a turbocharger to enhance their ability to protect against infection.The technology behind this improved flu shot is believed to be the first human drug in the world to be completely designed by artificial intelligence (AI). This represents the start of a new era where artificial intelligence is going to play an increasingly dominant role in drug discovery and design. “Professor Nikolai Petrovsky, Flinders Universitylast_img read more